The images I share here come from my heart. They are not to be reproduced without my express written permission.

The West Bank wall

In order to visit Bethlehem and Nazareth, it is necessary to travel behind the Israeli West Bank Wall. The wall is a separation barrier in the West Bank. Israel considers it a security barrier against terrorism, while Palestinians call it a racial segregation or apartheid wall. It is 440 miles long and 26 feet high, and it is highly controversial. Although Israel maintains it is necessary in order to reduce terrorism, the International Court of Justice found the barrier to be a violation of international law, and the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution that condemned the barrier by a vote of 150-6 with 10 abstentions.

This situation was one of the things I think I will not be able to fully understand as a Westerner visiting the Holy Land.


While another guard inspected our bus and questioned our driver and guide, this fellow looked like he was having a bit of a break.


The only time I felt uneasy in Israel was when we were behind the West Bank Wall. If nothing else made me doubt that there could be peace in the Middle East during my lifetime, this did. And although the iron gate below has nothing to do with the barrier enclosing this portion of the West Bank, it expressed the feeling I had until we emerged from the other side of the partition.




33 comments:

  1. I believe there will never be peace in the world until we learn to build bridges and not walls. Jesus taught the secret--to LOVE one another.

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  2. Thank you for this nice Linkparty.
    A wall is so bad, in Germany we lives many years with the wall (called "Berliner Mauer") between west and east germany.
    I really like it without so much more!
    Greetings
    Falk

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  3. One always hears about the wall - interesting but sad to actually see it.
    Maggie

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  4. You're right, we never can understand some problems in this area...
    Have a blessed week

    By the way: I'm hosting a weekly linkup "Weekend Green" in my new blog
    http://mascha-colorofhope.blogspot.de/

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  5. oh Sue, that series of posts about Israel gives me such a wish to visit it.

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  6. I don't think mankind will ever learn to build bridges rather than walls. Fear is a very strong emotion.

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  7. It's like that old poem about 'big fences make good neighbours' but it's the wall itself between then that builds the tension...

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  8. Fascinating post Sue. To see somewhere that you've heard so much about over the years, but never really seen.
    I think walls like this would make anyone feel uneasy. Thanks for hosting and sharing your photo's.

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  9. Too bad the world isn't learning from this. Wonderful post. Nice to read both sides of the issue, and your thoughts too.

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  10. I agree with Kenneth, People have not learned how to build bridges unfortunately. Can you imagine if everyone got along, how powerful that would be. Amazing photos!

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  11. Thanks for hosting. I would love to visit Israel. Great photos.

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  12. We couldn't get our guide to take us to Bethleham. So sad! Glad you were able to go!

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  13. I have a friend from Israel, so thankyou for sharing these stories and images. Have a wonderful week, and thanks again for the link up.

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  14. Great pics and thoughtful post. We to tear down the walls that separate us and become one.

    Thanks for hosting and have a wonderful week.

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  15. Heard a lot about this wall in the news media. I think it is a political issue!

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  16. Fascinating! Why can't we all just get along?

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  17. A political issue which I find it difficult to understand because too much truth were hidden.

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  18. Wow, a violation of international law? Wonder if we would run into that in the US? Anyway, glad you did not get in trouble for taking photos at the border. There are places where it is frowned upon, I've heard.

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  19. Having seen the wall in person, I had many of the same thoughts as you. As an outsider, it's just so difficult to grasp the issues posed by each side. :(

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  20. Walls do not protect us. Walls create fear.

    https://readerbuzz.blogspot.com/2017/03/the-world-from-back-of-truck.html

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  21. Sue, thank you for hosting. Sometimes walls are needed, not to keep good people out but those posing harm to a country and her people. Thanks for hosting. I sure enjoy this series of photos!

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  22. There have been conflicts between people and religion for over 2k years and sorry to say but there always be conflicts and no one can stop it until ALL people AND coverments are in to end it, and so long there is some sort of profit whatever it is power or money or both, for someone, we cant do anything....unfortunately.

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  23. That wall would give me an uneasy feeling too.

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  24. I can definitely understand why you felt uncomfortable behind the wall here Sue, just looking at the photos sent a chill down my spine, and like you, I wish for peace in the world every day and for all of us to be happy and safe, but I know that's a very idealised view of the world that is not always going to be possible. Another fascinating post here, thank you for hosting too! - Tasha

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  25. Que pena que los países construyan muros para separa en lugar de intentar unir que es mejor.
    Saludos.

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  26. Wow! That is an experience. I hope to visit personally one day and maybe better understand what is happening there. Thank you for sharing your experience.
    Traci

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  27. I think I would find that very confronting too. Makes me very sad about what the world is doing to itself. Thank you for sharing so I have better understanding too.

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  28. How did it make you feel about building a wall between US and Mexico? Any thoughts? cheers, kidcandoodle

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  29. I've never been "pro-wall". I have no idea how many miles of border we share with Mexico, Canada, and two oceans. There are so many possible points of entry, and it is impossible to wall off every conceivable spot where someone with evil designs can cross into the U.S. Even if we could afford to wall off every inch of border between ourselves and Mexico, there are still many thousands of miles of vulnerable spots where a terrorist could enter.

    But to answer your question more directly, seeing and passing through that wall made me doubt even more the wisdom of this approach. I could imagine that it would be easy to become both despairing and resentful to be sequestered in what felt like a large open-air prison. A people who develop that mind-set could easily be tipped over into a vengeful frame of mind. It seems that this could be counter-productive... more likely to lead to a terrorist mentality than to prevent terrorism.

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  30. It's so difficult to understand (for me anyway), I feel like this is something that's been going on for so long that it's a tangled mess.

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  31. Isreal has a right to protect itself though I don't know if this wall is the best way to do so. Reminds me too much of Germany. I remember all the celebrationsame when that wall came down so many years ago.

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